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Medications

You are responsible for taking the medications prescribed for you. You will be required to be familiar with your medications before you go home. Not taking your medications at the right time and in the correct amount is one of the most common reasons for transplant failure.

The following instructions are critically important:

  • Know the name and purpose of each medication.
  • Take each medication at the times prescribed on the medication sheet filled out by the transplant team. Take all medication exactly as directed. Try to take each medication at the same time every day.
  • Never skip a dose or change the amount of medication prescribed for you, unless instructed by your transplant coordinator or physician.
  • If you accidentally miss or skip a dose of your medication, call your transplant coordinator or physician immediately. Know the main side effects of the medications. If you experience side effects, call the transplant coordinator or physician.
  • Do not stop taking medications without permission from your physician.
  • Know how and when to reorder your medications. Investigate with your insurance company which pharmacy they prefer you use.
  • Do not take any medication not prescribed by your transplant team without first checking with the team. This includes all over the counter medications. Do not take Advil, Ibuprofen, Aspirin, Aleve and Motrin without discussing with the transplant team. You may take Tylenol. Please remember to follow dosing instructions.
  • Notify the transplant team if you have prolonged nausea, vomiting and/or diarrhea. These symptoms may affect the absorption of your medications.
The following are general medication storage guidelines:

  • Keep medications in the original container with the cap on tightly. If you use a special container to store medications, keep the container tightly sealed. Never take your cyclosporine/neoral out of the blister pack until you are ready to take it.
  • Store you medication in a cool, dry place away from direct sunlight. Never store medications in the bathroom. Moisture can cause medications to lose their strength.
  • Do not store medications in the refrigerator unless your physician or pharmacist advises you to do so. Never allow liquid medications to freeze.
  • Keep all medications away from children!

Immunosuppresive medications

Medication

PROGRAF (1mg and 5mg tablets)

Frequency

2 times per day

Side effects
  • Numbness and tingling in hands and feet
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • High blood pressure
  • High blood sugar
  • Loss of appetite
  • Reduced kidney function
  • Lymphoma
  • Increase risk of infection
  • Hair loss

Medication

NEORAL (100mg and 25 mg tablets)

Frequency

2 times per day

Side effects
  • Increased body hair growth
  • Swollen, bleeding gums
  • High blood pressure
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Reduced kidney function
  • Headaches
  • High blood sugar
  • Lymphoma
  • Increased risk of infection

Medication

PREDNISONE (5mg and 10mg tablets)

Frequency
1 time per day

Side effects
  • Stomach irritation
  • Mood swings
  • High blood sugar
  • Cataracts
  • Skin changes
  • Increased appetite and weight gain
  • Bone disease
  • Increased risk of infection

Medication

CELLCPT (250 mg capsules)

Frequency
2 times per day

Side effects
  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Leukopenia (blood abnormalities)
  • Lymphoma
  • Increase risk of infection

Medication

IMURAN (50 mg tablets)

Frequency
1 time per day

Side Effects
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Increase risk of infection
  • Leukopenia (blood abnormalities)

Combinations of immunosuppressive medications used

  • Prograf and Prednisone
  • Prograf and CELLCPT and Prednisone
  • Prograf and Imuran and Prednisone
  • Neoral and Prednisone
  • Neoral and CELLCPT and Prednisone
  • Neoral and Imuran and Prednisone

Your transplant physicians will make the decision about which medications are right for you.

Other medications

Antibiotic

Bactrim (substitutes will be made for allergies)

Antiviral

Acyclovir or Cytovene AntifungalMycelex Troches and/or Diflucan

Antihyperintensives

Procardia is most commonly used. Previous use of antihypertensives will be considered. *Some individuals will require more than on antihypertensive medication.

Anticlotting

Persantine or baby aspirin is most commonly used.

Antiulcer

Zantac, Pepcid, or Prilosec are most commonly used.

Diuretics

Most individuals will need a little diuretics after transplant. Lasix is most commonly used.