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8110 Gatehouse Road, Falls Church, VA 22042

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Inova Genitourinary (GU) Cancer Program focuses on providing specialized care for cancers found in the urinary system and the male reproductive system. GU cancers include:

Our Inova GU Cancer Program includes a team of experienced nurses, doctors and allied healthcare members who focus exclusively on treating GU cancers. Our team works together to develop a care plan to treat your specific cancer and meet the needs most important to you.

Contact Information

To schedule a new patient appointment, call our New Patient Coordinator at 571-472-1180. We are available Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Please have the following information ready when you call:

  • Date of cancer diagnosis
  • Referring provider name
  • Prognosis notes
  • Pathology report
  • Images/scans

If you have not been diagnosed with cancer, please follow up with our Inova Urology team at 571-472-7040 (Fairfax or 703-698-1856 (Fair Oaks).

Services That We Offer

GU Multidisciplinary Visit

Depending on the stage of your cancer, you might be eligible for our Inova GU Multidisciplinary visit. If you qualify, our GU team will review your case and recommend treatment options for your cancer. During the visit, you will meet one on one with the doctors who specialize in cancer care, including our medical oncologist, urologic oncologist and radiation oncologist, and ask questions about your case. Call 571-472-1180 to see if you qualify for this visit.

Nurse Navigator Support

Cancer care can be complex, so we have devoted resources such as our New Patient Nurse Navigators to help patients coordinate their care. Your New Patient Nurse Navigator will guide you through the initial steps and answer questions about your care.

Cancer Genetic Counseling

Life with Cancer®

Life with Cancer® is a free, psycho-social and education program that provides a variety of integrative therapies, wellness programs, groups and classes to patients and their families during and after cancer treatment. Services related to GU cancers include:

Fitness

Muscle Strengthening

  • Yoga Sculpt
  • Stay Strong
  • Love the Mat
  • Cardio and Core
  • Total Body Conditioning
  • Small group training (six-week series)

Yoga and Meditation

  • Tai Chi
  • Yoga Nidra
  • Chair Yoga
  • Gentle Yoga
  • Somatic Yoga
  • Restorative Yoga
  • Meditation & Guided Imagery

Dance and Other

  • Zumba
  • Joyful Belly Dance
  • Cardio Drumming

Groups and Education

  • Just for the Guys Support Group
  • Couples Coping with Cancer Group Series
  • Nutrition During Prostate Cancer Radiation
  • Bladder Cancer Group
  • Living Well with Advanced Cancer Group
  • Young Adult Group
  • Let's Talk About Sex: Women's Sexual Health and Cancer
  • Get Your Groove Back: A Group for Exploring Sexuality and Sensuality After a Cancer Diagnosis
  • What Every Man Should Know About Cancer and Sexual Health
  • Sex and Cancer for Men: A Group for Exploring Sexuality and Sensuality After a Cancer Diagnosis

Individual Appointments

  • Dietician
  • Massage and Acupuncture
  • Therapy (including sex therapy)
  • Psychiatry
  • Sex counseling, therapy and education

To learn more about Life with Cancer® and sign up for services, visit lifewithcancer.org or call at 703-206-5433.

Types of Cancer We Treat

Prostate Cancer

Prostate cancer develops in the prostate gland, which is located just below a man’s bladder. In many cases, prostate cancer grows slowly and can take several years for it to become large enough to detect.

What is Prostate Cancer?

Prostate cancer occurs when healthy cells in the prostate gland change and grow out of control. This causes a tumor to form. The tumor can be malignant or benign. A malignant tumor means it can grow and spread to other parts of the body. A benign tumor means it can grow but will not spread.

Prostate cancer has one of the highest survival rates of any cancer, especially in early stages. If it is controlled with existing treatment, a person may live in good health for many years.

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among American men, with more than 200,000 diagnosed with the disease every year. Currently, more than 2 million men in the United States are living with prostate cancer, and more than 16 million men are affected by prostate cancer around the world.

Causes of Prostate Cancer

Experts are unsure why some cells in the prostate gland become cancerous. Genetics can play a role in developing prostate cancer. For example, men who have a close relative (e.g., father, brother, son) with prostate cancer may be twice as likely to develop the disease, while those with two or more relatives are nearly four times as likely to be diagnosed. The risk is even higher if the affected family members were diagnosed before age 65.

Symptoms of Prostate Cancer

Since the tumor grows slowly, there are typically no symptoms for many years. In some cases, patients never show symptoms. If symptoms do occur, they can include:

  • Urinating frequently, especially at night
  • Weak or non-continuous urine stream
  • Trouble urinating or straining to urinate
  • Burning or pain while urinating
  • Trouble holding in urine
  • Feeling like your bladder hasn’t fully emptied
  • Blood in the urine or semen
  • Erectile dysfunction (difficulty getting an erection)
  • Dull pain in the groin or pelvis
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Bone, hip or back pain

It is important to know that prostate cancer has similar symptoms to a condition called enlarged prostate (also called benign prostatic hyperplasia, or BPH). Be sure to tell your doctor about any symptoms you have.

Diagnosing Prostate Cancer

Doctors use many tests to find or diagnosis cancer. They can also test to see if the cancer has spread to other parts of the body. If prostate cancer is suspected, your doctor might complete the following tests:

  • Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test – A blood test that measures the amount of PSA in your blood. PSA is a protein made inside the prostate. A high amount of PSA found in the blood may be a sign of prostate cancer.
  • Digital rectal exam – Your doctor will insert a lubricated, gloved finger into your rectum to check the size and texture of your prostate.

Typically, a PSA test is performed together with a digital rectal exam or imaging. Imaging methods for detecting prostate cancer include ultrasound, MRI, CT scan, PET, or a combination. Imaging tests can be completed before, during or after a biopsy. Your doctor will decide if you need a biopsy. A biopsy is a procedure in which a small sample of tissue is removed to test for cancer. A biopsy is the only test that can confirm you have prostate cancer.

After a biopsy is performed, it is given a Gleason score. This score represents how much your biopsy sample looks like normal prostate tissue. It also describes how aggressive the cancer is – how quickly it will grow and whether it will spread. Your Gleason score is one component used to develop your care plan.

Most prostate cancers have a Gleason score between 6 and 10. A Gleason score of 6 is low-grade cancer, 7 is intermediate-grade and 8 to 10 is high-grade. A higher score means the cancer is more likely to grow and spread quickly.

Treatment for Prostate Cancer

We work with different doctors such as medical oncologists, urologic oncologists and radiation oncologists to develop a personalized care plan for your cancer. Common types of treatment include:

  • Active surveillance to closely watch your condition with tests and biopsies performed on a regular basis that look for any changes in the tumor. This is often recommended when your cancer is confined to the prostate gland and slow growing.
  • Surgery to remove the tumor from your body. The type of surgery you receive depends on the size and location of your tumor. If a prostatectomy is recommended, your doctor will remove the entire prostate gland.
  • Radiation therapy to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Two main types are external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy. EBRT uses a machine outside the body to aim radiation at the tumor. Types of EBRT include image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and proton beam radiation therapy. Brachytherapy is an internal form of radiation therapy. Radiation is delivered inside the body by placing a radioactive object into or next to the tumor.
  • Hormone therapy to block or remove hormones, typically using pills or injections. Testosterone helps prostate cancer to grow. A hormone therapy such as androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) can stop your body from making testosterone, which will shrink the tumor or slow tumor growth. ADT is typically used in combination with other treatment options.
  • Chemotherapy – medicine helps destroy tumor cells and help keep them from growing. 

Prostate cancer treatment side effects can include:

  • Urinary incontinence – Leaking urine by accident. This can happen when you cough, sneeze, laugh, exercise or lift something heavy. Urinary incontinence can improve on its own or require pelvic floor exercises to strengthen your muscles.
  • Changes to your bowel and urine habits. Changes to your bowel habits can include loose and watery bowel movements. You might experience a frequent and sudden urge to urinate, need to urinate many times during the day or wake up multiple times during the night because you need to urinate.
  • Erectile dysfunction – Difficulty getting and keeping an erection that is firm enough for sex. Some men regain function within a year or two. There are medications that can increase blood flow to the penis, which will help with an erection.

Talk to your provider about potential side effects related to your specific treatment.

Resources for Prostate Cancer

Bladder Cancer

Bladder cancer often develops in the tissue cells that outline the bladder. The bladder is located towards the front of a person’s lower abdomen. Bladder cancer is a common cancer and mostly affects people aged 55 years and older.

What is Bladder Cancer?

Bladder cancer occurs when healthy tissue cells that outline the bladder change and grow out of control. This causes a tumor to form in the bladder. A tumor can be malignant or benign. A malignant tumor means it can grow and spread to other parts of the body. A benign tumor means it can grow but will not spread. Most bladder cancers are diagnosed at an early stage when the cancer is treatable.

Bladder cancer is the fourth most common cancer among American men. An estimated 81,180 adults in the United States are diagnosed with bladder cancer each year. In 2020, an estimated 573,278 people around the world were diagnosed with bladder cancer.

Causes of Bladder Cancer

Experts are unsure why some tissue cells around the bladder become cancer. However, there are different risk factors that may increase your chance of developing bladder cancer. Risk factors include:

  • Smoking: Smoking is the greatest risk factor for bladder cancer
  • Chemical exposure: Some chemicals used in dyes, rubber, leather, printing materials, textiles, and paint products have been linked to an increased risk for bladder cancer.
  • Race: Caucasian people are twice as likely to develop bladder cancer.
  • Age: The risk of bladder cancer increases as you age
  • Gender: Men are diagnosed with bladder cancer more often than women

Symptoms of Bladder Cancer

Symptoms of bladder cancer can include:

  • Blood in your urine
  • Urinating frequently
  • Pain when you urinate

It is important to know that having blood in your urine in not a sure sign of bladder cancer. Be sure to tell your doctor about any symptoms you have.

Diagnosing Bladder Cancer

Doctors use many tests to find or diagnosis cancer. If bladder cancer is suspected, your doctor may complete the following tests:

Urine test – A urine sample is collected into a clear cup. The sample is examined to see if the urine contains tumor cells.

Cystoscopy – A procedure where a tiny camera is placed through the urethra and into your bladder. This allows the doctor to see if there is any growth in your bladder.

Cystoscopy is a common procedure when bladder cancer is suspected. If your doctor finds something abnormal during the cystoscopy, they might recommend you get a biopsy. A biopsy is a procedure in which a small sample of tissue is removed to test for cancer. A biopsy is the only test that can confirm (diagnose) bladder cancer. A biopsy for bladder cancer is sometimes referred as a transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT).

During the diagnosis process you might have imaging tests done. Imaging tests for detecting bladder cancer include ultrasound, MRI, CT scan, or a combination of these tests. Imaging tests will help your doctor determine if the bladder cancer has spread to other parts of your body.

Treatment for Bladder Cancer

We work with different doctors such as medical oncologists, surgeons, and radiation oncologists to develop a personalized care plan for your cancer. Common types of treatment include:

  • Intravesical therapy - medicine that is instilled inside the bladder to prevent the cancer from coming back or worsening.
  • Surgery to remove the tumor from your body. The type of surgery you receive depends on the size and location of your tumor. Your doctor could recommend a radical cystectomy or a partial cystectomy. During a radical cystectomy the doctor will remove the bladder, nearby lymph nodes, and other organs in the pelvis during surgery. A partial cystectomy is a procedure where part of the bladder is removed. This procedure is typically not used for treatment because few people meet the eligibility criteria.
  • Radiation therapy to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. One main type is external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). EBRT uses a machine outside the body to aim radiation at the tumor. Types of EBRT include image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and proton beam radiation therapy. This treatment is typically used in combination with other treatment options.
  • Chemotherapy medicine helps destroy tumor cells and help keep them from growing. Your doctor might recommend that the medicine get delivered to your bladder through a catheter or through your veins, depending on how advanced the cancer is. This treatment is typically used in combination with other treatment options.
  • Immunotherapy medicine that helps your body identify tumor cells and helps your body destroy tumor cells.

Bladder cancer treatment side effects can include:

  • Urinary incontinence – Leaking urine by accident. This can happen when you cough, sneeze, laugh, exercise, or lift something heavy. Urinary incontinence can improve on its own or require pelvic floor exercises to strengthen your muscles.
  • Changes to your bowel and urine habits. Changes to your bowel habits can include loose and watery bowel movements. You might experience a frequent and sudden urge to urinate, need to urinate many times during the day or wake up multiple times during the night because you need to urinate.
  • Irritation and burning in the bladder
  • Blood in the urine
  • Erectile dysfunction – Difficulty getting and keeping an erection that is firm enough for sex. Some men regain function with a year or two. There are medications that can help increase blood flow to the penis that will help with an erection.

Talk to your provider about potential side effects related to your specific treatment.

Kidney Cancer

Kidney cancer develops in the kidney. Most people typically have two kidneys that are located just below the rib cage on each side of the spine. Kidney cancer mostly affects people aged 65 and older.

What is Kidney Cancer?

Kidney cancer occurs when healthy cells in one or both kidneys change and grow out of control. This causes a tumor to form. A tumor can be malignant or benign. A malignant tumor means it can grow and spread to other parts of the body. A benign tumor means it can grow but will not spread.

There are different types of kidney cancer. The most common subtype of kidney cancer is called clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC). About 85% of adults diagnosed with kidney cancer have RCC.

Each year, an estimated 97,000 adults in the United States are diagnosed with kidney cancer. Most people are diagnosed between the ages of 65 and 74. Kidney cancer is most common among Black and Native American people.

Causes of Kidney Cancer

Experts are unsure why some tissue cells in the kidney turn into cancer. However, there are different risk factors that may increase your chance of developing kidney cancer. Risk factors include:

  • Smoking
  • Obesity
  • Family history
  • High blood pressure
  • Chronic/advanced kidney disease
  • Genetic conditions

Symptoms of Kidney Cancer

In its early stage, kidney cancer shows no symptoms. Symptoms usually appear when the tumor grows and impacts other areas in the body. Symptoms can include:

  • Blood in urine
  • Pain in the side or back
  • A mass or lump in the side or back
  • High blood pressure
  • Anemia
  • Tiredness
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Loss of appetite

Be sure to tell your doctor about any symptoms you have.

Diagnosing Kidney Cancer

Doctors use many tests to find or diagnosis cancer. If kidney cancer is suspected, your doctor may complete the following tests:

  • Blood test – A blood test that checks the number of red blood cells.
  • Urine test – A urine sample is collected into a clear cup. The sample is examined to see if the urine contains tumor cells.
  • Imaging – Includes obtaining a picture using an ultrasound, CT scan, MRI, or any combination of these.

After the tests your doctor will decide if you need a biopsy. A biopsy is a procedure where they remove a small sample of tissue from your body to test for cancer. Not all patients with a kidney mass need a biopsy before surgery.

During the diagnosis process you might have imaging tests done. Imaging tests for detecting kidney cancer include ultrasound, MRI, CT scan, or a combination of these tests. Imaging tests will help your doctor determine if the kidney cancer has spread to other parts of your body.

Treatment for Kidney Cancer

We work with different doctors such as medical oncologists, surgeons, and radiation oncologists to develop a personalized care plan for your cancer. Common types of treatment include:

  • Active surveillance to closely watch your condition with tests and biopsies performed on a regular basis that look for any changes in the tumor. This is often recommended when your cancer is confined to the prostate gland and slow growing.
  • Surgery to remove the tumor from your body. The type of surgery you receive depends on the size and location of your tumor. Your doctor could recommend a radical nephrectomy or a partial nephrectomy. During a radical nephrectomy the doctor will remove the kidney and nearby tissue. A partial nephrectomy is a procedure where the tumor is removed from the kidney.
  • Ablation to remove the tumor from your body using heat or cold energy. Your doctor may recommend a radiofrequency ablation or a cryoablation. Radiofrequency ablation is a procedure where a needle is inserted into the kidney tumor and then an electric current is passed to destroy the cancer cells. Cryoablation is a procedure where a metal probe is inserted into the kidney tumor and then cold air is passed to freeze and destroy the cancer cells.
  • Radiation therapy to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. One main type is called external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). EBRT uses a machine outside the body to aim radiation at the tumor. Types of EBRT include image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), and proton beam radiation therapy.
  • Oral targeted therapy medicine helps contain the tumor cells by affecting blood vessels to keep them from growing. This treatment may be used in combination with other treatment options.
  • Immunotherapy medicine that helps your body identify tumor cells and helps your body destroy tumor cells.

Kidney cancer treatment side effects can include:

  • Urinary incontinence – Leaking urine by accident. This can happen when you cough, sneeze, laugh, exercise, or lift something heavy. Urinary incontinence can improve on its own or require pelvic floor exercises to strengthen your muscles.
  • Changes to your bowel and urine habits. Changes to your bowel habits can include loose and watery bowel movements. You might experience a frequent and sudden urge to urinate, need to urinate many times during the day or wake up multiple times during the night because you need to urinate.
  • Tiredness

​​​​​​​Talk to your provider about potential side effects related to your specific treatment.

Resources for Kidney Cancer

Testicular Cancer

Testicular cancer develops in the tissue cells of one or more testicles. Testicles are located in the scrotum. Testicular cancer is almost always curable when found early.

What is Testicular Cancer?

Testicular cancer occurs when healthy tissue cells in the testicles change and grow out of control. This causes a tumor to form in the testicles. A tumor can be malignant or benign. A malignant tumor means it can grow and spread to other parts of the body. A benign tumor means it can grow but will not spread.

Testicular cancer is one of the most common solid tumor cancers in young adult men, between ages 20 and 34. An estimated 9,910 people in the United States are diagnosed with testicular cancer annually. About 74,458 people around the world are diagnosed with testicular cancer every year. Testicular cancer is one of the most curable solid cancers.

Causes of Testicular Cancer

Experts are unsure why some tissue cells in the testicles become cancer.

Symptoms of Testicular Cancer

The most common symptom is a lump or swelling on the testicle. Other symptoms may include:

  • Pain or discomfort on the testicles
  • Change in how a testicle feels (i.e., heavier, grow bigger or become smaller)
  • Pain in the lower abdomen or groin
  • Lower back pain
  • Swelling in one or both legs

Be sure to tell your doctor about any symptoms you have.

Diagnosing Testicular Cancer

Doctors use many tests to find or diagnosis cancer. If testicular cancer is suspected, your doctor may complete the following tests:

  • Physical exam where the doctor will feel the testicles for any sign of swelling, tenderness, or hardening. The doctor will also feel for enlarged lymph nodes around your body. This will help determine if the cancer has spread.
  • Ultrasound imaging test that uses sound waves to produce an image of the body part being examined.
  • Blood tests – there are called tumor markers, doctors can get blood samples to look for proteins that are produced by the cancer cells such as alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), beta human chorionic gonadotropin (bHCG), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH).

If your doctor finds something abnormal during the ultrasound, they might recommend you get an inguinal orchiectomy procedure. During the procedure the testicle is removed. Once removed the doctor will have a sample of the testicular tissue tested for cancer cells.

During the diagnosis process you might have other imaging tests done. Imaging tests for detecting testicular cancer include MRI, CT scan, or a combination of these tests. Imaging tests will help your doctor determine if the testicular cancer has spread to other parts of your body.

Treatment for Testicular Cancer

We work with different doctors such as medical oncologists, surgeons, and radiation oncologists to develop a personalized care plan for your cancer. Common types of treatment include:

  • Surgery to remove the tumor from your body. The type of surgery you receive depends on the size and location of your tumor. Your doctor could recommend a radical inguinal orchiectomy. During a radical inguinal orchiectomy the doctor will remove the testicle with the tumor.
  • Radiation therapy to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. One main type is external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). EBRT uses a machine outside the body to aim radiation at the tumor. Types of EBRT include image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and proton beam radiation therapy.
  • Chemotherapy medicine helps destroy tumor cells and keep them from growing.

Testicular cancer treatment side effects can include:

  • Problems with fertility
  • Tiredness
  • Loss of appetite

Talk to your provider about potential side effects related to your specific treatment.

Resources for Testicular Cancer

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